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shutterstock_194891645I’ve written before about how change can feel like betrayal to friends and family. What happens is that sometimes it feels so scary that they drag you back and you find yourself in that same rut you’ve been trying so hard to leave. They like you there because having you there is familiar, it makes sense to them. If you change then they have to change (or at the very least change their ideas about you). And they didn’t sign up for that; they don’t necessarily want to change.

Sometimes their need for sameness will be so great that they will refuse to see that you are different.

Let’s say that when you were a little kid you hated birthday parties. Maybe you were shy and hated being the center of attention while everyone sang you happy birthday. Or say you’ve never liked frosting and dreaded the inevitable first bite of birthday cake. I don’t know but let’s just say that’s how it is — you didn’t like birthdays parties.

That became your thing as you grew up. That’s what your friends and relatives would say about you.

“Now that one over there?” they’d say, jerking their thumbs your way. “That one hates birthday parties.”

They would tell all the stories of you sitting in a corner scowling while everyone else made a fuss about presents. They’d pull out pictures that would show you wailing over the birthday cake your grandmother made, even though she’d hand drawn a beautiful frosting design showcasing your favorite characters from Sesame Street across the top.

The more they said it, the more you believed it. Besides there’s proof in everyone’s stories and in all of the photo albums; you are a person who hates birthday parties.

Only one day you start figuring out that it’s all more complicated. Perhaps you went to a birthday party where there was no singing and everyone made their own sundaes. You thought to yourself, “That’s not so bad, that’s pretty good. Maybe I don’t hate birthday parties — maybe I just don’t like getting sung at and eating frosting.”

So you go back and tell your friends and family, “Hey, I’m throwing myself a birthday party this year! Do you want to come?”

And they scoff, “You? You, hater of all birthday parties? You who threw up all over my birthday party when I was eight because we generously gave you a corner piece of cake with a big blue rose on it?”

“Well, yeah,” you say. “I hate frosting but I love birthday parties.”

“No, you don’t. You hate them.”

“Turns out I love them when they get thrown a certain way.”

“Oh so now you’re criticizing the way we throw parties? Now it’s our problem? And now you expect us to accommodate all your new fangled ideas about sundae bars when you know that in our family we eat cake! See, that’s you all over again — ruining birthdays for other people because you hate parties!”

At this point you might start feeling a little crazy. Are they right? Are you fooling yourself? Do you owe it to people to continue on your birthday party-less way because you’ve been such a trial to them throughout your life?

See, there’s a birthday-party-hater slot in their lives and you’ve been filling it for however many years. If you don’t fill it, it means they have to change and while some people can handle change pretty well (perhaps your Aunt Leonie and your best friend from fifth grade handle your new-found love of birthday parties with equanimity) everyone else might freak out.

This can be because

1) they don’t want to think critically about their own creation of your birthday party myth (your grandmother might not want to feel guilty about that Sesame Street cake); or

2) because they need you to fill that slot to avoid their own birthday party hatred (it might be that your little sister hates frosting, too, but needs you to stand in for her so she doesn’t have to suffer the consequences); or

3) they like the story they’ve been telling themselves and don’t want to stop telling it.

You can’t know, really, why they don’t want to let you out of the rut you’ve been in but every time you try to climb out, they push you back in. You throw yourself the party, you invite them all and they stand around and smile sympathetically at you, “Look at you trying to pretend you’re enjoying yourself!”

“But I am,” you say. “This Goat Cheese with Red Cherries ice cream from Jeni’s is to die for.”

“Sure,” they say, nodding and winking at you. “Sure thing.”

Because sometimes that’s how it is.

That leaves you with three choices:

  1. To sigh and let yourself get pushed back into the rut and give up on birthday parties.
  2. To argue with them until it becomes a big old thing and you’re all crying with frustration.
  3. To go on with your bad birthday party loving self anyway and not worry so much about how other people take the Brand New You.

There is a reason there’s a whole genre of television and movies about how you can’t go home again and it’s about growth and change and figuring out how to be the person you’ve become when the people who have been part of your life from the beginning can only see how you were. It’s painful for everybody and certainly for the person trying to grow into something different.

Change is hard but it’s worth it. There are birthday parties out there just waiting for you to show up.

And here’s Whitney Houston’s live cover of “I Am Changing” from Dreamgirls.

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